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Chinkapin Oak

Chinkapin Oak Quercus muehlenbergii


  • Chinkapin Oak - Quercus muehlenbergii
  • Chinkapin Oak - Quercus muehlenbergii
  • Chinkapin Oak - Quercus muehlenbergii
  • Chinkapin Oak - Quercus muehlenbergii

Average Shipping Height: 2' - 3'
Item #3790
Member Price *
$8.98
Regular Price
$13.50
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Cannot ship to AK, AZ, CA, FL, HI, LA, OR, WA
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Overview

The Chinkapin Oak grows in zones 4-7.
With its strong branches and interesting leaves, the chinkapin oak makes a beautiful statement. This conversation piece of a tree is worthy of a prominent place in any larger lawn, estate, or park. The magnificent oak also adds to the ambiance by attracting a variety of wildlife with its acorns. In fact, chinkapin acorns are the food of choice for many animals.

  • Displays light ashy gray bark and fall color with yellow-orange to orangish-brown leaves
  • Produces acorns that are popular with wildlife
  • Adapts to many different soils
  • Will be delivered at a height of 2'–3'

 




Your Tree’s Personality

Mature Height

40'–50'

Mature Spread

50'–60'

Growth Rate

Slow to Medium

Shape

Rounded

Sun Preference

Full Sun,

Soil Preference

Acidic, Alkaline, Clay, Drought-tolerant, Loamy, Moist, Sandy, Well-drained, Wet,

Wildlife Value

Chinkapin oak acorns are the preferred food for wild turkeys, grouse, white-tailed deer, black bears, chipmunks, squirrels and hogs. Cattle will eat the leaves.

History/Lore

The chinkapin oak is also commonly referred to as a yellow chestnut oak, rock oak or yellow oak. Early pioneers used its straight wood to make thousands of miles of fences in the states of Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana. Later on, the trees were used to fuel the steamships that ran from Pittsburgh to New Orleans. They were also used as railroad ties for the new railroads that crisscrossed the Midwest.

Planting Instructions


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