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Paper Birch

Paper Birch Betula papyrifera



Average Shipping Height: 3' - 4'
Item #2889
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  • Bare Root
    3' - 4'
    Member Price $10.98
    Reg. Price $17.00
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Cannot ship to AK, AZ, CT, HI
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Overview

The Paper Birch grows in zones 2-7.
Beauty and romance may be the first images many people associate with the gleaming white paper birch. But this symbol of the North Country — and state tree of New Hampshire — has earned its place in history as a continuously useful tree. Today it is one of the best-loved trees of the New England landscape, planted often for the beauty of its distinctive bark and fall color.

  • Provides brilliant yellow fall color
  • Develops a smooth, white bark that curls and peels (once mature)
  • Is highly deer-resistant
  • Will be delivered at a height of 3'–4'

 




Your Tree’s Personality

Mature Height

50'–70'

Mature Spread

N/A–35'

Growth Rate

Medium to Fast

Shape

Oval

Sun Preference

Full Sun, Partial Shade,

Soil Preference

Acidic, Clay, Drought-tolerant, Loamy, Moist, Sandy, Well-drained,

Wildlife Value

Wintering moose find the sheer abundance of paper birch in young stands important, despite the poor nutritional quality. White-tailed deer eat considerable amounts of paper birch leaves in the fall. Snowshoe hares browse paper birch seedlings and saplings, beavers find it a good second choice food and porcupines feed on the inner bark. Voles, shrews, Redpolls, siskins and chickadees eat the seeds. Numerous cavity-nesting birds nest in paper birch, including woodpeckers, chickadees, nuthatches and swallows. Pecking holes in the bark, the yellow-bellied sapsucker finds the paper birch a favorite tree. Hummingbirds and red squirrels then feed at sapwells created by sapsuckers. Ruffed grouse eat the catkins (flowers) and buds.

History/Lore

The paper birch received its name from the nature of its bark. Long ago, people would peel layers of the thin, paper-like bark and write on it as a way to send messages. More descriptive names include white birch and canoe birch—recalling its favor among Native Americans and early fur trappers as a resource for sleek, sturdy, and lightweight watercraft.

Planting Instructions


Ratings/Reviews



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